Welcome To Tactical Clips

Get These Awesome Videos delivered directly to your Inbox!

Article Blades Firearms

Making a Machete with No Power Tools – Survival, Prepper, Beginning Blade Makers

Join The Tactical Clips Group - Sign Up For Our e-Mail List Today!

In order to protect your email account from spam we have sent you a confirmation link. Please click on the link in that email right away to make sure you do join us!

Walter Sorrells presents Making a Machete with No Power Tools – Survival, Prepper, Beginning Blade Makers. In this video, Sorrells demonstrates how to make an 18-inch machete using nothing but hand tools! This video is perfect for knife makers who don’t have highly equipped shops, as well as to survival folks who want to make high quality cutting tools under challenging, rustic circumstances.

All Your Tactical Supplies at wholesale+15%

Ammunition at just above wholesale!
All Your Tactical Supplies at wholesale+15%

Ammunition at just above wholesale!

Sorrells starts with a piece of 0-1 Precision Ground Steel which is 18 inches long, 3 inches wide and 1/10 inches thick. He draws on the basic shape of the machete on the steel. He then uses a hacksaw and file to remove the excess material.

After removing all the excess steel, Sorrells moves on to make the handle. He uses a small piece of curly cherry and traces the shape of the handle on the slender wood blocks. He uses a saw, file and chisel to get the shape of the handle. He then drills three 1/8 inch holes into the steel for the handle pins and a 1/4 inch hole for the tube.

Next, Sorrells bevels the steel. It takes a bit of work, but this step is what essentially turns a piece of flat steel into a knife. After filing for hours, Sorrells starts the heat treatment. He uses a propane torch to heat the blade. He notes that if viewers don’t have a torch, the blade can be heated with charcoal.

Sorrells uses a magnet to check if the blade is near the ideal temperature of 1,500 degrees Fahrenheit. Steel becomes non-magnetic once it reaches 1,425 degrees Fahrenheit, so it is a great guide during heat treatment. Once the blade hits the ideal temperature, it is quenched in peanut oil. After the blade has cooled down, it is once again heated in a stove at around 475 degrees Fahrenheit for an hour.

Sorrells goes back to work on the handle, filing it down and using epoxy and pins to put the blade and wood handle together. He uses clamps while waiting for the epoxy to cure. Finally, he files down any excess material from the handle, making it easier to hold.

 

Discuss This Article

comments

To Top

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This

Share this awesome post with your friends !